Biography

The Short Version

I grew up in Vancouver, studied at McGill and Columbia, and now live in Brooklyn. I’ve Jeff 2012always been fascinated by journalism and the media business and, after working three years as a lawyer, I decided to try my hand at being a full-time writer.

I like newspapers and online media in equal measure, and I also remain active in the legal community. In my spare time, I like to watch baseball, drink bourbon, explore New York and go camping.

The Formal Version

Jeff ProfessionalMy career is built on two passions – law and writing – and I strive to explain issues about technology, publishing and privacy in clear and direct language.

My educational background includes a BA, JD (LLB) and BCL from McGill, and an MA from Columbia Journalism School with a concentration in business.

I began my legal career as a law clerk at the Federal Court of Canada, where I prepared cases on patent trials, immigration hearings and a variety of regulatory disputes. As a lawyer, I advised Canada’s broadcast regulator on new media issues, and worked in private practice for First Nations bands in Northern Canada.

After graduating from Columbia, I worked for Reuters, first as an intern in Paris, and then as a legal writer in New York. I moved to paidContent (now Gigaom) in 2011, where I reported on new media and advertising; my primary focus is now legal and regulatory issues that affect the technology industry.

My publications include an e-book on the Google Books project (based on my Columbia thesis) and scholarly work on intellectual property and contract law for McGill and Oxford universities. I’m also the editor of “IP News this Month,” a newsletter out of the McGill Faculty of Law about current IP issues that is sent to law professors and practitioners.

I remain active in the legal community through the New York City Bar Association where I served three years on the Copyright and Literary Property Committee, and now sit on the Entertainment Law Committee.

In the future, I plan to expand my research on how Google Books is transforming libraries and the way we read, and to further explore the shifting role of privacy and digital property in the age of Facebook and viral media.

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